Safekeeping the Original Mortgage Note

Can you easily locate the original mortgage note?

This important legal document should be kept in a safe place, and here is why!

The promissory note is a promise to pay or IOU from the property buyer. It spells out the amount due and terms of repayment. In legal jargon it is known as a negotiable instrument. Similar to a check, the original must be presented to collect or prove ownership.

If the seller desires to sell and assign the payments to a note buyer, the investor will ask for the original note to be provided at closing. The promissory note is then endorsed over to the investor. Similar to endorsing a check, the holder signs on the back of the note.

Sample Note Endorsement on Back of Original Mortgage Note

Pay to the order of, (Insert name of investor), without recourse.


Dated this ____ day of _______, 2011.

(Seller Signs and Dates)

Sometimes the note endorsement is executed on a separate piece of paper, also called an allonge. The allonge is then attached as a permanent rider to the original note. The endorsement enables the investor to prove they are a holder in due course, with the same rights of repayment as the original note holder.

An investor may also ask for the original recorded mortgage or deed of trust at closing. However, if this original is lost, an investor will usually accept a certified copy from the county recorder’s office.

A lost original note, on the other hand, can cause a problem. In most states the note is not recorded. If the original note becomes lost a note investor may ask for a duplicate or replacement note to be signed by the payer or maker. This means going back to the person that owes you money and asking them to resign. This relies on their cooperation and can cause delays.

The investor will also ask for a lost note affidavit from the seller or note holder, stating the note has been lost and it will be presented if found at a later date.

Some investors will consider accepting just the lost note affidavit with a copy of the original note.  However, this is increasingly rare as a lost original note can create problems foreclosing should the buyer stop making payments.

The best option is to avoid losing the note by keeping it in a safe deposit box or a fire and waterproof safe. Some sellers elect to have the original held by their attorney or a third party servicing agent for safekeeping.

Whatever method you choose, be sure to keep the original mortgage note in a safe place that is easily located!


Why Sell My Mortgage Note?

Accepting payments on the sale of real estate might have made sense at the time, but circumstances change.

Many sellers discover they would now prefer cash today rather than the small amount that trickles in each month.

Here are just a few reasons people have sold all or part of their seller financed mortgage notes for cash:

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Learn the Value of Your Mortgage Note

Wondering just how much your mortgage note is worth?

The value of a note or contract is affected by many factors including the:

  • Down Payment
  • Terms of the Note
  • Buyer’s Credit Rating and Payment History
  • Type of Property Sold and Its Current Value

Since each transaction is unique, we offer a free note analysis based on your individual situation.

Fortunately it is easy to obtain a free evaluation in 3 easy steps:

Step 1 – Gather Copies of Documents

The first step is to gather copies of the documents. The primary documents utilized in the quoting process are:

  • Settlement Statement
  • Mortgage (Deed of Trust, Real Estate Contract etc)
  • Promissory Note, and
  • Payment Record

Hopefully copies are easily accessible with the originals located in a safe deposit box or other secure location for safekeeping. If a seller later decides to sell the payments then the investor will ask for a few other documents plus the appropriate originals at closing. But for now these copies will be reviewed for an accurate quote.

Step 2 – Complete the Quote Request Worksheet

The Quote Request Worksheet, also known as a Mortgage Submission Worksheet, is a simple single page form. This worksheet summarizes the transaction with most of the information obtained from the document copies. It includes details on the property type, buyer, repayment terms, and current balance. (Please visit the Quote Request and Free Note Analysis page to print a PDF version of the worksheet or to submit online).

Step 3 – Send for Review

The third step is to submit the worksheet and the document copies to an investor for pricing. Depending on the investor this might be submitted via email, fax transmittal, or an online submission process.

Most note buyers will provide a free no obligation quote within 48-72 hours. The quote is generally good for 30 days and is subject to due diligence, which includes review of the title, appraisal, insurance, buyer’s credit, and other underwriting items. The more information an investor has up front the fewer “subject to” items they will include with the evaluation.

Click Here to Request a Free Note Analysis!